Protective Factors

School Protective Factors

 

Opportunities for Positive Involvement - When young people are given more opportunities to participate meaningfully in important activities at school, they are less likely to engage in drug use problem behaviors.

·   In my school, students have lots of chances to help decide things like class activities and rules.

·   There are lots of chances for students in my school to talk with a teacher one-on-one.

·   Teachers ask me to work on special classroom projects.

·   There are lots of I have lots of chances to be part of class discussions or activities.

·   There are a lot of chances for students in my school to get involved in sports, clubs, and other school activities outside of class.

 

Rewards for Conventional Involvement (Recognition) - When young people are recognized and rewarded for their contributions at school, they are less likely to be involved in substance use and other problem behaviors.

·   My teacher(s) notices when I am doing a good job and lets me know about it.

·   The school lets my parents know when I have done something well.

·   I feel safe at my school.

·   My teachers praise me when I work hard in school.

 

Peer Individual Protective Factors

 

Social Skills - Young people who are socially competent and engage in positive interpersonal relations with their peers are less likely to use drugs and engage in other problem behaviors.

·   You're looking at CD's in a music store with a friend. You look up and see her slip a CD under her coat. She smiles and says, "Which one do you want? Go ahead, take it while nobody's around." There is nobody in sight, no employees and no other customers. What would you do now?

·   It's 8:00 on a weeknight and you are about to go over to a friend's home when your mother asks you where you are going. You say, "Oh, just going to go hang out with some friends." She says, "No, you'll just get into trouble if you go out. Stay home tonight." What would you do now?

·   You are visiting another part of town, and you don't know any of the people your age there. You are walking down the street, and some teenager you don't know is walking toward you. He is about your size, and as he is about to pass you, he deliberately bumps into you and you almost lose your balance. What would you say or do?

·   You are at a party at someone's house, and one of your friends offers you a drink containing alcohol. What would you say or do?

 

Healthy Beliefs and Clear Standards (Belief in the Moral Order) - Young people who have a belief in what is "right" or "wrong" are less likely to use drugs.

·   I think it is okay to take something without asking if you can get away with it.

·   I think sometimes it is okay to cheat at school.

·   It is all right to beat up people if they start the fight.

·   It is important to be honest with your parents, even if they become upset or you get punished.

 

 

Community Protective Factors

 

Rewards for Conventional Involvement (Recognition) - Rewards for positive participation in activities helps children bond to the community, thus lowering their risk for substance use.

·   My neighbors notice when I am doing a good job and let me know about it.

·   There are people in my neighborhood, or the area around where I live, who encourage me to do my best.

·   There are people in my neighborhood, or the area around where I live, who are proud of me when I do something well.

 

Family Protective Factors

 

Family Attachment (Influences Bonding) - Young people who feel that they are a valued part of their family are less likely to engage in substance use and other problem behaviors.

·   Do you feel very close to your mother?

·   Do you enjoy spending time with your mother?

·   Do you share your thoughts and feelings with your mother?

·   Do you feel very close to your father?

·   Do you enjoy spending time with your father?

·   Do you share your thoughts and feelings with your father?

 

Opportunities for Positive Involvement - Young people who are exposed to more opportunities to participate meaningfully in the responsibilities and activities of the family are less likely to engage in drug use and other problem behaviors.

·   My parents give me lots of chances to do fun things with them.

·   My parents ask me what I think before most family decisions affecting me are made.

·   If I had a personal problem, I could ask my mom or dad for help.

 

Rewards for Conventional Involvement (Recognition) - When parents, siblings, and other family members praise, encourage, and attend to things done well by their child, children are less likely to engage in substance use and problem behaviors.

·   My parents notice when I am doing a good job and let me know about it.

·   How often do your parents tell you they're proud of you for something you've done?

·   People in my family stay mad at each other.